Monthly Archives: December 2006

The Totally Knackered Tour Across Europe and Central Asia by Bicycle 2006

The Totally Knackered Tour Across Europe and Central Asia by Bicycle 2006

Kyrgyzstan offers the tourist a great variety of stunning scenery and a very warm welcome. It is probably the most tourist friendly of the former Soviet Republics in Central Asia, having done the most to cut red tape and develop a infrastructure aimed at the budget traveller. All in all we can thoroughly recommend Kyrgyzstan.

http://www.timbarnes.ndo.co.uk/kyrgyz_info.htm

It’s a Shepherds Life

 It’s a Shepherds LifeJammed between China, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan and Tajikistan, former USSR state Kyrgyzstan has to be amongst the most obscure countries on the earth. It’s also one of the most ravishing, with royal blue lakes, old growth forests and mountains teeming with nomadic shepherds. Welcome to life without internet.

http://www.leisatyler.com/shepherdslife.php
DestinAsian, 2006

Travelmag – Crossing the Torugart

Travelmag – Crossing the Torugart

The Torugart Pass is a remote pass high in the Altai Mountains between Kyrgyzstan and Xinjiang province of China.  It is not recognised by the Chinese as a regular tourist entry point, so crossing is not straightforward.  We crossed it in May of 1999, en route to Kashgar and the start of the Karakoram Highway.

http://travelmag.co.uk/?p=1183
21/12/2006

Travelmag – Crossing the Torugart

 

Travelmag – Crossing the Torugart

The Torugart Pass is a remote pass high in the Altai Mountains between Kyrgyzstan and Xinjiang province of China.  It is not recognised by the Chinese as a regular tourist entry point, so crossing is not straightforward.  We crossed it in May of 1999, en route to Kashgar and the start of the Karakoram Highway.

http://travelmag.co.uk/?p=1183
21/12/2006

Beauty or Bleakness? Seeking Jazz in Kyrgyzstan During the Holiday Season

Beauty or Bleakness? Seeking Jazz in Kyrgyzstan During the Holiday Season

When the Soviet Union collapsed, a lot of countries experienced a cultural awakening. In Kyrgyzstan, the artists fled.

So says saxophonist Arthur Dew, a former resident of the capital city of Bishkek, during a break between sets at a gig where he’s sitting in with some friends. The sports bar buzz and youthful crowd are hardly signs of deprivation. But the surrounding buildings are aging Cold War-era cement relics, most of them dark and quiet except for a neon sign outside a gloomy, living room-size casino. There may not be a similar band playing anywhere else in the country on this wintery evening.

http://www.allaboutjazz.com/php/article.php?id=23984